HomeNewsFeaturesDisplay

Green Dot: The first step in preventing violence

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Sheree Luckey, 48th Force Support Squadron First-term Airman Course non-commissioned officer in-charge, explains the concept of the three Ds during a Green Dot general overview training at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Sept. 9. To sign up for a class, visit the Green Dot SharePoint and select one of the classes provided weekly. If assistance is required, contact your unit training manager or call DSN: 226-2882. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Sheree Luckey, 48th Force Support Squadron First-term Airman Course non-commissioned officer in-charge, explains the concept of the three Ds during a Green Dot general overview training at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Sept. 9. To sign up for a class, visit the Green Dot SharePoint and select one of the classes provided weekly. If assistance is required, contact your unit training manager or call DSN: 226-2882. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Peter Sipos, 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron flight commander, attempts to solve one of the scenarios during a Green Dot general overview training at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Sept. 9. Participants in the training solve several realistic scenarios using methods taught to them during classroom discussion. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Peter Sipos, 48th Aerospace Medicine Squadron flight commander, attempts to solve one of the scenarios during a Green Dot general overview training at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Sept. 9. Participants in the training solve several realistic scenarios using methods taught to them during classroom discussion. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Julie Stich, 48th Medical Group radiology technician and Green Dot implementer, speaks to Airmen during a Green Dot general overview training at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Sept. 9. The training revolves around teaching Airmen how to recognize, analyze and respond to an incident involving interpersonal violence. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Julie Stich, 48th Medical Group radiology technician and Green Dot implementer, speaks to Airmen during a Green Dot general overview training at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Sept. 9. The training revolves around teaching Airmen how to recognize, analyze and respond to an incident involving interpersonal violence. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH, England -- “No one has to do everything, but everyone has to do something,” is the mantra of the Green Dot initiative, which aims to develop a culture of intolerance to violence, throughout the Air Force.

The volunteer-run Green Dot training is a mandatory class for active duty members, which offers three ways Airmen can intervene in potentially harmful situations: Direct, Delegate and Distract.

“The three Ds provide options for every type of person because it takes a lot of people doing something, not one person doing everything, to make a difference,” said Tech. Sgt. Michelle Imperial, 48th Component Maintenance Squadron programs flight chief and Green Dot implementer. “This is leading toward a change within our culture, a change within people’s minds.”

Airmen are expected to respond when harm is being done to another, and this program revolves around teaching Airmen how to recognize, analyze and respond to interpersonal violence— domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual assault, rape, and gender or sexual orientation discrimination.

Fourteen Liberty Wing Airmen volunteered to be Green Dot volunteers, also known as ‘implementers’, to train others on the program.

“All of our people have been absolutely passionate about the program,” said Joshua Hudson, 48th Fighter Wing primary violence prevention specialist. “Every Airman has a story and [the implementers] tell theirs, which is the most authentic way to reach their peers.”

Group discussions were held over fictional situations involving interpersonal violence.

The activities, or realistic scenarios, provide Airmen with strategic approaches on how to get involved and diffuse circumstances that may be harmful toward Airmen, families and community members. According to Hudson, there is an important fourth aspect Airmen are learning– making a decision.

For one of the training participants, Senior Airman Will Garcia, 48th Equipment Maintenance Squadron crew chief, the class brought back memories of a violent experience someone close to him encountered.

“If I see something like this happening, I need to stop it; we need to stop it,” Garcia said. “I don’t want anyone going through what my friend and many others have. Those scars never heal.”

To sign up for a class, visit the Green Dot SharePoint and select one of the classes provided weekly. If assistance is required, contact your unit training manager or call DSN: 226-2882.