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 Dr. David Lisak trains Liberty first responders on how to treat sexual asssault victims at the Strike Eagle Complex on April 6, 2011.
 This is one of several opportunities offered for Sexual Assault Awareness Month.
 For more information on upcoming events, contact Master Sgt. Tami Anderson at 226-2300.
 
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Liberty first responders learn to help SA victims
ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH, England – Dr. David Lisak, associate professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts in Boston, Mass. provides sexual assault awareness and prevention training to crime scene first responders at the Strike Eagle Complex on April 6, 2011. First responders include security forces, fire department and emergency medical personnel. This training is to ensure that first responders treat the victim’s in a manner that will not further traumatize them.
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Liberty first responders learn to help SA victims

Posted 4/7/2011   Updated 4/7/2011 Email story   Print story

    


by Senior Airman Tiffany M. Deuel
48th Fighter Wing Public Affairs


4/7/2011 - ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH, England -- If a crime scene is trampled through, it can destroy the investigation and make the scene worse.

The same can be said for a victim of sexual assault who is not treated properly by the first responders.

To ensure this does not happen, Dr. David Lisak, associate professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts in Boston, Mass, provided sexual assault awareness and prevention training to crime scene first responders at the Strike Eagle Complex during Sexual Assault Awareness Month on April 6, 2011.

First responders include firefighters, emergency medical personnel, security forces members and any other Airmen who arrive on a crime scene first. This training is to primarily prevent them from unintentionally causing more harm to the victim.

"It is important that [first responders] receive special training to handle situations, as delicate as sexual assault, properly," said 2nd Lt. Kristen Wolverton, 48th Fighter Wing Sexual Assault Response deputy coordinator.

Dr. Lisak covered a wide range of sexual assault preventive measures and how to handle a victim of sexual assault without causing further trauma.

"[You] should follow your instinct. Be respectful and careful of their boundaries. Tell them what you are doing before you do it," said Dr. Lisak.

Sexual assault awareness and prevention training is the first step in reducing the amount of crimes that happen and go unreported.

Dr. Lisak has been educating the United States Air Force Airmen on sexual assault awareness and prevention since 2003.

"It's crucial, and it is part of the Air Force's effort to raise the level of awareness amongst all Airmen and to know the true nature of the victims and to know how the sexual offenders operate,"said Dr. Lisak.



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